Jersey City Fashion Week 2016: 3 Model Captains Real Talk About Modeling



3 JCFW Model Captains Speak...

Angel Rodriguez, Dante Briggins & Erica Carrington


Laurie Perrone, This Jersey Girl's Fashion Week Special Edition:

First off tell us how you were “discovered” and how your modeling career started?

DANTE BRIGGINS, ACTOR AND MODEL:

...literally caught (not) red-handed...

I was discovered walking out of the H&M store located near Grand Central Station. A gentlemen ran out of the store after me attempting to gain my attention. I was under the assumption that he thought I was shoplifter. I explained to him that I paid for all my items and even pulled out my receipt to show him. He then told me that he worked for a modeling agency and asked if I had ever considered a career in modeling. I answered "no". He gave me his card and told me to contact him. I did and the rest was history.” 

This Jersey Girl asks: True, Kinda True or Myth?

From a male perspective, are the egos in modeling competitions as harsh as they say?

Dante answers: "Kinda true...and not to sound sexist or anything, but men are less catty about grabbing the prize of the Ultimate Gig; we're a little more supportive of one another, more or less...and as I see it modeling is primarily a women's profession, again not to be sexist! (He laughs) After all, who spends more time and money on beauty products like makeup and skin creams?  Women do...who spends most of the time in the makeup chair?  Women, of course!  In photo shoots, male models serve as "accessories" to the female models...like  bracelets or a hand bags.  I see this changing, so I'm not discouraged by it, I'm just saying that the modeling industry appeals primarily to the female market."


Laurie Perrone, This Jersey Girl's Fashion Week Special Edition:

Sometimes the modeling industry gets a bad rap with the jealousy and egos encountered between other models and agencies. Was this true for you? Have you managed to tough it out and make good friends?


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ANGEL RODRIGUEZ, STUDENT AND COVER MODEL:

...pride cometh before the fall...

"Yes, this is very true, but to be a model you must have a strong character. You need to adjust to curtain settings as well as crowds, but not all models are like this. You will find many down to earth models that can end up being your long term friend, but always remember to carry yourself in a positive manner, continue to be humble and you will always go further than those who are self-centered."

This Jersey Girl asks: True, Kinda True or Myth?


From a female perspective, are the egos in modeling competitions as harsh as they say?

Angel answers: "Kinda true.  I've witnessed cattiness, but not at every single show.  Once, at a photo shoot, I had several outfit changes for my session I shared with another model.  Each of us were assigned to certain outfits, and so we proceeded with the shoot.  While I was changing outfits, the other model "stole" my photo time with a few of my other outfits! I modeled one! At first, I was pissed, like 'are you serious?' Then, I remembered gratitude and I was pleased that at least I was able to model one outfit.  Ultimately, I decided to let it go because I didn't want to leave behind a negative image about myself; at the end of the day, I didn't want to stoop to something so petty by staying angry.  I just dismissed it."


Laurie Perrone, This Jersey Girl's Fashion Week Special Edition:

Erica, you give everything you do 300%; I say this because you have 3 full-time jobs as you are  a full-time wife a full-time mom and a full-time model. You give each of these jobs 100% of your time how do you do it?





ERICA CARRINGTON, FULL-TIME WIFE, MOM, AND MODEL:

...remembering what is important...

"Well I believe in putting my hundred percent into everything I do,  However my priorities STILL come first and my first priorities are my little girl and my husband. That is the order of things in this life: family first, an then everything else second. My husband and my family are my rocks. Success will always be there for the taking. There are always opportunities for success but you only get those small precious moments with your family and children.  Then, my focus is the children at the school where I work as a teacher educating children  with disabilities.  It is so very rewarding watching children with disabilities learn and understand basic life skills.  

Don't get me wrong I love modeling, doing photo shoots and I love the thrill of coming through successfully to the other side of the exhausting hours I put into doing photo shoots. It gives me a sense of accomplishment where I can inspire others.   My goal is to show other women that it's never too late to try something new no matter where you are in life whether you are a wife, a mom, a full-time worker or all three like me. I'm very strict about time management-that's the key to not losing your sanity.

However, for me,  there is no bigger accomplishment than seeing young children who wouldn't otherwise succeed making small accomplishments.  To disabled children, mall accomplishments are huge.  At the school where I work we make a big deal out of every small achievement every child makes.  As their  teachers, our encouragement means everything to them."

This Jersey Girl asks: True, Kinda True or Myth?

How true is it that drug use runs rampant in the modeling industry?

Erica answers: "Kinda true, but from my own spiritual viewpoint, entirely unnecessary. I'm not trying to sound preachy, but I'm just going to say it. Modeling for some people, especially for some young people is like high school all over again.  They want to part of the cooler more popular "in-crowd."  I on the other hand walk to the beat of my own drum, so I never wanted to be anything other than who God created me to be. REAL and NOT strung out. Unfortunately, society confuses people people about how things should be and what people  should be doing with their lives.  For too long society has been trying to usurp God's original plans for people's lives by making the more popular way of doing things more attractive;  I hate to say it, but  for years the industry has contributed to this  manipulative mentality.  I am proud to say that the industry is moving away from this heading towards the direction of what's real as opposed to putting up facades.  I'm into showing people what's real, contributing to pulling down the strongholds of "the fantasy."

more about Erica!



xoxo & stay fabulous!




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Laurie Perrone is an adorable Jersey girl and a contributing volunteer writer, blogger and Editor-In-Chief for This Jersey Girl's Career & Style Magazine writing about up-and-coming entrepreneurs in fashion, style and the creative arts.  Her top column is still This Jersey Girl in Manhattan,  formerly published by Maglomaniac Online Magazine

Perrone is also the Jersey City Fashion Week Correspondent covering everything Fashion Week, and featuring fresh Fashion Week talent in This Jersey Girl in Manhattans' sister column, This Jersey Girl's Fashion Week Special Edition, formerly published by Maglomaniac Online Magazine as well.

Perrone is an up-and-coming creative artist in her own right, as she also enjoys writing Christ-based, mental illness recovery juvenile and young adult fiction. Her breakout YA novel series is entitled The Fire in Grace. Catch a glimpse of Perrone's series by visiting her books page at The Fire in Grace.

You can follow indie author and fashion journalist Laurie Perrone at:


Perrone lives happily with her Italian Jersey boy husband John in Northern New Jersey.



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